upwards

upward, upwards
1. The only form for the adjective is upward (in an upward direction), but upward and upwards are both used for the adverb, with a preference for upwards in BrE:

• The launcher consists of a small nozzle that directs a jet of water upward at an angle of approximately 45 degrees —Scientific American, 1973

• James had rounded off sums downwards rather than upwards —writing £900 for an actual £975 for example —K. M. E. Murray, 1977.

2. Upwards of (or occasionally upward of) is first recorded in the early 18c in the meaning ‘rather more than’ and remains in standard use:

• British Gas boiler installations cost upwards of £2,000, but you can get them much cheaper elsewhere —Sunday Times, 2007.

3. The adverb upwardly occurs mainly in the expression upwardly mobile, meaning ‘aspiring to social and professional advancement’.

Modern English usage. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • upwards of — UK US preposition (US usually upward of) ► if a number, value, etc. is upwards of something, it is at least that amount or more: »The rescue plan is expected to cost upwards of $10 billion …   Financial and business terms

  • upwards — UK US /ˈʌpwədz/ adverb (US usually upward) ► towards a higher position, level, or value: »The UK s export figures are expected to be revised upwards next month …   Financial and business terms

  • upwards of — ► upwards of more than. Main Entry: ↑upward …   English terms dictionary

  • upwards — [[t]ʌ̱pwə(r)dz[/t]] (The spelling upward is also used. In American English, upward is the more usual form.) 1) ADV: ADV after v, n ADV If someone moves or looks upwards, they move or look up towards a higher place. There, said Jack, pointing… …   English dictionary

  • upwards of — adverb also upward of 1. : more than : in excess of signed upwards of 10,000 bills into law and vetoed more than 1500 Beverly Smith 2. : a little less than : not quite …   Useful english dictionary

  • upwards — up|wards [ˈʌpwədz US wərdz ] adv also upward especially AmE 1.) moving or pointing towards a higher position ≠ ↑downwards ▪ Pointing upwards, he indicated a large nest high in the tree. ▪ The path began to climb steeply upwards. 2.) increasing to …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • upwards — also upward adverb AmE 1 moving or pointing towards a higher position: Hold the gun so that it points upwards. opposite downwards 2 increasing to a higher level: Salary scales have been moving steadily upwards: . opposite downwards 3 more than a… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • upwards — adv. upwards of (upwards of an hour) ( somewhat more than an hour ) * * * [ ʌpwədz] upwards of ( somewhat more than an hour ; upwards of an hour) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • upwards */*/ — UK [ˈʌpwə(r)dz] / US [ˈʌpwərdz] adverb 1) towards a higher position She glanced upwards at the screen. 2) towards a higher or more important level The initial estimate has been revised upwards. 3) more than a particular number or amount upwards… …   English dictionary

  • upwards — I upwards [ˈʌpwədz] or upward [ˈʌpwəd] adv 1) towards a higher position Ant: downwards She glanced upwards at the screen.[/ex] 2) towards a higher or more important level Ant: downwards The initial estimate has been revised upwards.[/ex] 3) more… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

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